USING ADVERBS IN ENGLISH

Adverbs modify, or tell us more about, other words. Usually adverbs modify verbs, telling us how, how often, when, or where something was done. The adverb is placed after the verb it modifies

:Examples

The bus moved slowly

The bears ate greedily

The car drove fast

Sometimes adverbs modify adjectives, making them stronger or weaker

:Examples

You look absolutely fabulous

He is slightly overweight

You are very persistent

Some types of adverbs can modify other adverbs, changing their degree or precision

:Examples

She played the violin extremely well

You’re speaking too quietly

FORMING ADVERBS FROM ADJECTIVES

In most cases, an adverb is formed by adding -ly to an adjective

Adverb Adjective

Cheaply

Quickly

Slowly

Cheap

Quick

Slow

If the adjective ends in -y, replace the y with i and add -ly

Adverb Adjective

eaeily

angrily

happily

luckily

easy

angry

happy

lucky

If the adjective ends in -able-ible, or -le, replace the -e with -y

Adverb Adjective

probably

terribly

gently

probable

terrible

gentle

If the adjective ends in -ic, add -ally. Exception: public -> publicly

Adverb Adjective

basically

tragically

economically

basic

tragic

economic

Some adverbs have the same form as the adjective: early, fast, hard, high, late, near, straight, & wrong

:Examples

It is a fast car

He drives very fast

This is a hard exercise

He works hardWe saw many high buildings

The bird flew high in the sky

Well is the adverb that corresponds to the adjective good

:Examples

He is a good student

He studies well

She is a good pianist

She plays the piano well

They are good swimmers

They swim well